Erin was very diligent in class. And twice a day, thanks to the #freedomnia tool, she took a trip to the net to learn more. She hoped that with everything she learned, she could end the stress that gripped her.

Would she be able to get rid of the controller in the implant in time? Especially since she had no idea how much time she had left. The #freedomnia members were very friendly and gave her all the information they could, and plenty of ideas for testing to do, but unfortunately she couldn’t communicate much with them, so she had to largely fend for herself.

She knew that any change in her demeanor would eventually attract attention, she tried to keep a normal demeanor, but the more she looked around the more she saw blank, dull gazes. She was noticing more and more absences from class, and was afraid of what it meant: soon the majority of students would be unaware of it under the control of the Academy.

She hadn’t seen Phyl since they broke up. They could see each other from afar in the amphitheater or in the dining hall, but they had not spoken again. She had no idea whether he had finally succumbed to it, or what that involved. From a distance he looked quite normal.

She hadn’t told Cerise about the event either: Cerise had asked her not to tell her about what she was doing, and she stuck to it. As far as she knew, Cerise hadn’t been to the hospital yet, so she still wasn’t fully affected. But if she could find a way to stop the implant, she would give Cherry the benefit.

Although she has, on the ideas of the members of #freedomnia, tested a lot of things to understand how the implant works, so far nothing she has done has been convincing.

She’d done a little network capture first, to find out how the Academy was communicating with the implant. And if she had found the network frames sent by the Academy to her implant, she had no idea what they were.

She then installed a sniffer, in order to observe the data exchanged between her implant and her computer, while she was using the implant. But unfortunately, again, she was not quite sure what to do with the information gathered.

Finally, she had tested fuzzing, that is, sending random data, in the hope that a dataset would generate special responses, allowing them to define the communication protocol used. But, from his perspective, it was not a success. Nothing she had done seemed to have worked.

Kwier had asked her to stop this kind of testing, because by sending anything as donated, she could have done something stupid with her implant, and it could have been dangerous. She still sent #freedomnia the data she had collected so they can analyze it.

She was starting to feel like a caged lion. She didn’t want to lose her integrity, and the impending threat made her paranoid.